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of two compromises and begins with ronald reagan presidency, where tax reform was a hugely important issue and hugely difficult issue to get done between republicans and democrats. those of us who lived through the reagan era's recognize that people thought they were very polarized. tip o'neill was a staunch liberal democrat. ronald reagan's staunch republican. yes, they crafted a bipartisan compromise with bradley dan rostenkowski bob packwood being part of the movers of this compromise. password to the affordable care act. it is arguably even more difficult to craft a compromise within one party, the democratic party because of the permanent campaign and how not just polarized, but resistance to compromise the two parties were. so the comparison between the tax reform act and the affordable care act helps us see how much more difficult compromise now is an how much more important it is for two parties to get together to craft a compromise on immigration, tax reform, and many other issues that the country now needs. >> host: is there a golden age of compromise? to real crises, 9/11
for this was the ronald reagan operation, the ronald reagan campaign and the ongoing echoes of that campaign. they didn't have one organization, but they had a series of organizations to make certain that they played for the long pull. they played for history. and they were in many ways effective in doing that. now we're in the 21st century. and what president obama did during the campaign, he took the most creative thinkers that he could find, people to use the cliche who think out of the box. he married them up, if you will, wedded them, molded them into the information era high technology whiz people who knew how to leverage the information age to his electoral advantage. now that's what they want to do with this organize for action. and frankly, i wouldn't bet against them. this could be very, very effective as he tries to get his agenda going and maintain it. but make no mistake, we are dealing here and the country is dealing with and the republicans are dealing with a somewhat different barack obama. you could feel it today. it's been coming for some days, i think, that in the first term he was y
deal to him. >> okay. 1985 ronald reagan comes up. he says exactly the opposite. exactly the opposite of barack obama reagan says the government's the problem. we ought to get the government out of the way and unleash the american people who will return the nation to prosperity. reagan very popular president among americans remains so. personally, personally barack obama very popular. i think his personal rate is around 59%. job approval 52. how can this country in the space of, what, almost 30 years, change so dramatically in our philosophy? >> well, first of all, obama today did say that it's a fiction to believe that government alone can solve all of the problems. so he is taking somewhat of a middle course now. if you look at that speech, i mean, it's an odd speech he just threw out things. there is kind of no coherent plan and, again, i think the missed opportunity was to say to the american public and the world, look, this is where i'm going. this is what matters. one, two, three. these are the things i'm going to do. and there was a scatter shot approach. and i think a lot of t
for partisanship and he'll be that when the time arises. this was answering ronald reagan from 32 years ago. his whole philosophy was intensively individualistic. president obama answered that today. and he said an old speech writers device. to repeat again and again, we the people, we the people. the first three words of our founding document. he embraces that, he said to ronald reagan, we're stronger together. and i thought it was powerful but philosophical. i thought this was obama at his best. >> i saw a lot of tweets from republicans saying this was a call for big government that he didn't reach out enough. >> there was partisanship. it is hard to deny when he directly rebuked the gop by saying we are not a country of takers. by defending the government level of programs, social security, medicare, medicaid. but directly rebuking paul ryan and the 47% comment that got mitt romney in trouble. there may have been high arching philosophical tones but there were also those tones. >> are you embracing the 47% comment? >> no, no, i wouldn't say, i don't know if it is fair to say it wasn't partisa
at it as a reply to ronald reagan in 1981. in the same place ronald reagan got up and said government is not the solution to the problem, government is the problem. yesterday was sort of not only a response to that but almost a bookend as reagan moved the country in a conservative direction. barack obama obviously hopes to move it in a liberal direction. >> the "new york times" editorial had this to say. mr. obama is smart enough to know that what he wants to achieve in his second term must be done in the next two years, perhaps even the first 18 months. there is no doubt that mr. obama has the ambition and intellect to place himself in the first rank of presidents. with this speech, he has made a forceful argument for a progressive agenda that meets the nation's needs. we hope he has the political will and tactical instincts to carry it out. lot of things in that quote, but one that struck me, we always talk about how it's a never-ending campaign now. is that what we're looking at now, a president has 18 months to get something done? >> i would be a little bit -- i would say six to e
's post columnist and msnbc contributor e.j. deon. >> great to be here. >> thanks, e.j. ronald reagan was worn some as the 40th president of the united states ushering in an era of limited government and the rise of the modern conservative movement. yesterday barack obama, the 44th president of the united states, was sworn in for his second term. the moment that will define progressive politics m years to come and one that symbolizes a renewed faith and the power of the american government. needless to say, it was a day several decades in the making. >> for the first time in history government, the people said, was not our master. it is our servant. >> government is not the problem, and government is not the solution. we, the american people, we are the solution. >> the commitments we make to each other through medicare and medicaid and social security, these things do not sapp our nation. they strengthen us. they do not make us a taker of nags. they free us to take the risks that make this country great. >> as he made a forceful case for economic equality and the social safety net pr
washington, james madison, andrew jackson, theodore roosevelt, dwight eisenhower, ronald reagan and bill clinton. the game is a special case in his successful second term was so brief. it's interesting to note that only presidents who had a more successful second term than their first were james madison and andrew jackson. the following is an accounting of the president-elect did to a second term and the reasons for those failed for a troubled second term. for failed because of a water seems on unwinnable. jefferson, truman, johnson and bush were the foyer. also for a failed because of the economic crisis for failure to act and deter such a crises. these are jefferson, cleveland, coolidge, franklin roosevelt's and george bush. it failed due to their inability to lead congress for jefferson, monroe, grant, well some, truman, johnson, nixon and bush. franklin roosevelt and richard nixon. for he did not affect the philly communicate their agendas or initiatives for jefferson, monroe, grant in cleveland. obviously failure for second term president has been their inability to successfully wor
worked with ronald reagan. he understood you need political solutions, not military solutions. when the soviet troops were ready to come out of the barracks so the berlin wall would not come down, he told them to stay in the barracks, the empire is going. we cannot be a country that will be one of glasnost and perestroika if we live the way we have. it is the 20th anniversary of the soviet union, the end of the soviet union. many people in russia blame him for the economic conditions in which they live. they blame him for the end of the country that many felt was the cradle to grave welfare state instead of a totalitarian system. i have great respect for him. you can also see people's weaknesses. you talked about all salvador. what about the priests and nuns? to me, that is the people power in that situation. flm was a revolutionary force seeking power. the people power were trying to alleviate poverty, trying to find balance. >> liberation theology had a stronger effect on the underlying society. i have to read this. you are listening to the commonwealth of california radio program
, military heroes, entertainers, people ranging from ronald reagan
. the first bill was introduced four days after dr. king was assassinated in 1968. 15 years later ronald reagan signed it. >>> tomorrow investigators plan to conduct more tests on the battery system of boeing 787 dreamliners. the ntsb will carry out the tests in arizona. one battery caught fire that led to the grounding of the aircrafts world wide. >>> caltrans will repair the bay bridge bumpers. the funders worked and there was no damage to the bridge structure. the bumpers are made of steal and plastic. repairs are estimated to cost $2 million. the commission hopes to have the company that owns the ship to pay for repairs. >> we are going to take a quick break and we will be right back. >>> complete bay area news coverage continues right now, this is ktvu channel 2 news at 5:00 p.m. >> friends and co-workers paying tribute to two men who drowned while on vacation in hawaii this weekend. ktvu's allie rasmus is live in san francisco with more. >> reporter: we have seen large waves here this weekend but beachgoers 2400 miles away in hawaii faced similar conditions. it was a rogue wave tha
terms. you look back at someone like ronald reagan or look at franklin roosevelt, you have much more kind of explicit ideological statements about government and what it is. actually the speech that it reminded me -- the most of was woodrow wilson inauguration in 1913. we are celebrating that anniversary as well, the 100th anniversary. in part because the issues are similar, climbed change now, environmental issues and taxation in banking. but the idea that people can't do certain things on their own and we need to come together. >> david? >> let me defend myself. let me attack richard. margaret thatcher gets a bad rap for that. that was -- >> that was -- >> i've always thought she got a bad rap. of who is paying tax bills that speech was first on liberalism i do think it was the most unapologetically liberal speech we've heard barack obama give. it was tracing american history saying that he faced to our ideals we have to change and we have to change in a collective direction. we have to guarantee equal income for women for the same work, he mentioned gay rights, mentioned clima
that teflon president ronald reagan. i have the words that come after them, hoover bill and have her eyes. president herbert hoover was in charge of the feeding of europe and the foodstuffs for the world. the hoover eyes need to be careful, not wasted, not throw food away. that's a positive turn back. , but yeah i do that because that's part of their legacy. >> are the reasons it nicely harder for president obama to notably nila chase analyst for the founding father? can he talk about how you research the book? >> it's probably a little bit harder, but if you just look at the language created by the internet and in the last 20 years, it probably isn't. it may happen by chance. when lincoln creates a really interesting words, one of the words he first uses he's talking about secession. he said the secessionist sugarcoating the impact on this country. the printer of the united states comes to lincoln and says we cannot put this in the official record. lincoln said i can't imagine any american not knowing. again, going back to william safire's influence on his, one of the first uses of cool,
to look at, do not repeat roe. roe was happened at a time the rapid social change, ronald reagan signed the most liberal abortion law in the country. this put a stop at all of this. this decreed liberal success before it was in the culture. it creates all the social tension. let the people work it out in the states. in referenda. but not to do it by decree on high. i hope that the court learned that lesson and won't do the same with gay issues as well. >> bret: fox polled right before the election, a.b., had the split pro-choice. you know, depending on the poll, it is a fairly close split. change here and there. >> those people would argue that using the terms is not really accurate polling. everyone is pro-life, even if they support the right to an abortion. other polling, majority in the high 60s in support for roe and legal abortion. that said, pro-life movement waged on restriction and access has been suckbe sesful. they have succeeded in acting restriction -- enacting restrictions across the country in every state that has reduced access to abortion that has taken the pro-choice mo
be the liberal ronald reagan? could he be someone who could articulate liberalism in terms that were motivating, that were deeply rooted in american values, and moved the country in his direction? i think this speech was the first signal that he has that potential. this is not just ghazi, happy talk, hope and change, kumbaya. this was him staking a claim to a different kind of patriotism. and saying that in order for us to be who the founders want us to be, we have toticontinue to include the dr. kings and the latino community and everybody else. that was powerful. >> let's take a look at a moment a lot of people have been talking ability. one of president obama's open mike moments. i did get the sense, i mean, you're saying he's not going to see this again. you got the sense in his making that speech that he's not going to make a speech like that -- he doesn't have an opportunity to make a speech like that again in this moment in history, in this moment in his presidency, and i felt like these were a number of things he wanted to say. >> i think he was speaking to history. he has spent a lot o
that is to his advantage. i think he sees himself again as the ronald reagan of the liberal and progressive movement. he wants to be remembered by history as a fighting liberal and he feels that he is on the right side of history demographically and politically. that is the sense that i have gone from him since his election. -- excuse me, reelection. neil: thank you very much. pat buchanan. you are looking at joe biden right there in a tux. that's what it's supposed to look like. bernie sanders, the senator on the fine state of vermont was the only fellow who was wearing a tie. looking very similar to our very own rich edson. i will just leave it at that. whatever your feelings of the vice president of the united states, he is wearing a tux. we will have more afterwhen this e upside down. >> hi. >> hi. yoknowi can save you 15% today if you open up a charge card account with us. >> you just read my mind. >> announcer: just one little piece of information and they can open bogus accounts, stealing your credit, your money and ruining your reputation. that's why you need lifelock to relentlessl
as the ronald reagan of the liberal and progressive movement. he wants to be remembered by history as a fighting liberal and he feels that he is on the right side of history demographically and politically. that is the sense that i have gone from him since his election. -- excuse me, reelection. neil: thank you very much. pat buchanan. you are looking at joe biden right there in a tux. that's what it's supposed to look like. bernie sanders, the senator on the fine state of vermont was the only fellow who was wearing a tie. looking very similar to our very own rich edson. i will just leave it at that. whatever your feelings of the whatever your feelings of the vice president of the united before copd... i took my son fishing every year. we had a great spot, not easy to find, but worth it. but with copd making it hard to breathe, i thought those days might be over. so my doctor prescribed symbicort. it helps significantly improve my lung function starting within five minutes. symbicort doesn't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden symptoms. with symbicort, today i'm breathing better. and that means.
]. >> obama is basically declaring the end of the era of reagan. he said that ronald reagan was historically consequences in a way that bill clinton was not. and what obama meant is that obama changed the ideological course of the country. . in 1981 within two minutes reagan declared government is not the solution government was the problem. and this speech was owed to big government. it was a hymn to big government. >> because it was a stupid thing for ronald reagan to say. where did government spending go under ronald reagan by the way? >> stephanie: yeah. >> hello? the government is not the solution the government is the problem, except when it comes to buying aircraft carry ores. >> stephanie: yeah. bill o'reilly yesterday. >> he appealed to emotion rather than the million -- mechanics of getting everybody in place of recovery. he is on the road to disaster and doesn't seem to care. >> stephanie: wow. >> everything looked disastrous yesterday, didn't it? he looked like it's over men -- >> brown people lying around in costumes. >> my political career is over. i like bill o'rei
the president who bucks that trend and doesn't get credit for it is ronald reagan. we tend to think of reagan and iran-contra as the second term. it's also true that he didn't go to geneva this until 1985 and the man who managed to push the cold war toward it then did so largely in that second term. >> rose: bill clinton also i guess you could say got welfare reform in the second term, did he not? >> actually, it was before the election in 1996 and he created his own problems as we know and that's one of the grat tragedies of modern american history is this enormous man, the best politician since lyndon johnson to hold the office who ran into the impeachment issue and ended up squandering at least a year and a half, two years. so -- and i think the other -- the most recent example i think by pretty common consent, president bush did better after what he called his thumping in 2006 when he finally fired donald rumsfeld, brought in bob gates and began to move to slightly more of a center position before the economy collapsed. >> rose: so what's the challenge for president obama in the second te
saw... i think this was the most ideologically assertive inaugural address since ronald reagan's first speech, this being the unreagan. >> brown: was it in overt language or symbols or we were talking earlier today as we were talking about the code... >> there was a coded language. talking about takers, we're not a nation of takers and so forth making reference to the sword and those kinds of things. he knows references that he knows people will understand and that codes people will get. so it was really about ideas. one of the things that i mentioned before about him not mentioning names, it was about ideals and ideas. so he was there, i think, summoning the will that beverly talked about. saying we are here together. this is your country. we are citizens. let's make it happen. it is very ideolodge igal. this is barack obama saying who he actually is >> brown: and what is that? i mean, what came through that connects, you're talking about the connection to roosevelt and other presidents in the past. what's the vision that you felt came through? >> i think often in inaugural addresses
with the "reno gazette-journal's" editorial board. >> i think ronald reagan changed the trajectory of america, in a way that, you know, richard nixon did not. and in a way that bill clinton did not. he put us on a fundamentally different path, because the country was ready for it. >> that wasn't the way president obama talked during his first term, but that was the guy who launched his second term yesterday. in an 18-minute address, the president laid out a defense of liberalism, a forceful argument for progressive values. just as president reagan made the conservative movement mainstream in the '80s, this president wants to mainstream liberalism, to leave a center-left country as his political legacy. >> we have always understood that when times change, so must we. that fidelity to our founding principles requires new responses to new challenges. that preserving our individual freedoms ultimately requires collective action. >> the president took on conservative opponents, making this unmistakable reference to wisconsin congressman and republican vice presidential nominee, paul ryan, who call
on the conservative commentary, decrying ronald reagan's speeches when he put out conservative principles. the government is the problem, not the solution, and gave a point of view. so, i mean, it's really i think hypocrisy on their side saying, oh, my god, the president is sharing his values with us. that's what he was doing. i think it was very bold and very well-put, and this is what we have been fighting about for the last four years. it's what we will continue to fight about for the next four years. i thought one key point to the president's speech was, he said, listen, guys, talking to his core constituency groups, i can't do this on my own. you have to be engaged and we have to come up and win the best, sometimes partial victories we can because this is a 400-year long march that we're engaged in. >> i want you both to listen to the great senator mitch mcconnell who today this very -- >> must we? >> this very day said his objective, of course, remember in the first term was to make sure the president didn't get a second term. well, now this is what he says today. >> one thing that'
commentator suggesting the president's mission now is to reverse everything that ronald reagan put in place 30 years ago. our panel debates that in a moment. >> this was really obama unbound and i think what is most interesting is that obama basically is declaring the end of reaganism in this speech. jenna shared her recipe with sharon, who emailed it to emily, who sent it to cindy, who wondered why her soup wasn't quite the same. the recipe's not the recipe... ohhh. [ female announcer ] ...without swanson. the broth cooks trust most when making soup. mmmm! [ female announcer ] the secret is swanson. bill: some breaking news from the high court. supreme court will not consider an appeal over how much authority the epa should have in setting air quality standards. that appeal filed by a company that operates one of the three main u.s. copper plants. it was appealing a decision by the d.c. circuit court in july that had uphold the environmental protection agency, the epa's new air quality standard for sulfur dioxide. you got that? martha: got it. bill: all clear? martha: leading conservative cha
not addressing that? ronald reagan looked into the mental health institutions. why should we take whatever basic civil liberties it? guest: that as a central aspect and both parties agree that certainly, in the case of these high-profile shootings like a new town and the debbie giffords shooting and others that sometimes the problem is with the state of the shooter. we saw that in colorado, apparently as well. in many cases, you look back on these instances and it turns out to their warning signs along the way and that the mental health system, the educational system, did not have any way of taking these people in and channeling them into some kind help for themselves. how you deal with that? have you identify those people? how do you fund these programs? these are legitimate and complicated issues that will probably be part of this debate. there is no easy answer to any of this. my guess is that we will see some incremental changes, efforts to fund particular things, pilot programs that might have some broader lessons that can be applied. host: on the economy, president obama yesterday said the
? ronald reagan closed all of the mental health institutions. why aren't we looking into reestablishing them? versus taking one of our basic civil liberties away. guest: absolutely a central aspect to this -- both parties agree in the case of these high- profile shootings that sometimes the problem is with the state of the shooter. we saw that in colorado. in and he, you look back on these instances and it turns out there were warning lines and that the mental health system, the educational system did not have any way of taking these people in and channeling them in some kind of help for themselves. how do you deal with that? how do you fund these programs? all of those are complicated issues that will probably be part of this debate. there is no easy answer to any of them. what will see are a lot of incremental changes, efforts to fund things, pilot programs that might have some broader lessons. host: on the economy, president obama said the recession is over. we are on our way to the recovery. might republicans take issue with that part of the speech? guest: they will. the jobless num
read in our "wall street journal" today, we have an excerpt from ronald reagan's inauguration. the job market was really expanding back in. dagen: steve, great to speak with you. take care. connell: we brought in chief market strategist from america financial and. the question today is can this continue, david? >> i do not think it will continue at that case. you have the federal reserve doing everything in its power to make sure that this economy stays on track. that is number one. number two is inflation is well behaved. you also have corporations that have deleveraged their balance sheets. and you now have the consumer coming back as well. when you add all of this together, the improvement in the energy sector, foreign economy starting to do a little bit better, i think the stock market do well in the second term. just not as good as the first. connell: what if they mess it up again in washington? we will go into another round of negotiations, maybe we won't, on the debt ceiling. maybe we go over one of them. you have to take that into account. how does that change your odds taking
, we must act. it's funny, gretch mentioned ronald reagan, he once famously said the nine most terrifying words in the english language are, i'm from the government and i'm here to ten. essentially that's what the president said yesterday. if you're in the middle class, i'm from the government and i'm here to help you. >> brian: bill clinton and ronald reagan said the year of big government is over. essentially in different ways. so this is the president. the president said, let's focus on rights. he have talked about seneca falls. selma, referring to the 1965 civil rights movement, and stonewall where the gay rights movement took root in 1965. and also he talked about we're focusing again on the environment. i guess green technology. what he says is climate change, which is interesting because he's talking about gay rights. he probably wouldn't be talk being that if joe biden didn't ram rod him into it on a sunday comment that popped up. and with green technology, that's been a disaster when he ram rodded t the stimulus money. i hardly think it's settled scientific collective
've been a republican for 30 years. i voted for ronald reagan. i voted for the first george bush. i voted for the first term of the second george bush. >> thanks for coming. we ask you to call in the line that best reflects your political point of view. pamela is in new bedford, massachusetts on our democrats line. hi. >> caller: hi. for me i could be no more proud of being a woman, being a vet flan the united states marine corps. today was wonderful. seeing all the line the parade route, the female marines, navy females, i just am amazed that how much progression that we have made, society as a whole and it is nice to see military people actually being awarded their metal of honor. older veterans as well as younger veterans. god bless america and god bless all the military people in afghanistan and iraq. host: this is a live look inside the convention center. service members enjoying the party at the commander in chief's ball. waiting to hear from vice president biden. we'll stay here live and continue to take your phone calls and tweets from inaugural 2013. here is a tweet from jon will
solar panels on the white house, that ronald reagan later tore down. but jimmy carter's vision of government is getting a little bit more of a second chance, i think, with obama's second speech. >> reaffirmed, perhaps, even. >> luke, you've covered the hill. what was the hill's response, yesterday, to the president's speech, to the events of -- >> before president obama had even left the luncheon, there was a statement out from cathy mcmorris rodgers, number 4 in the house gop conference who basically said, okay, there's a lot of nice words in this speech, but we would like to see some literal action. and the literal action is persuading the senate to pass a budget so we can move forward on fiscal issues. so i think you'll see some folks on the republican side, say, it was a beautiful moment for their country. obviously, they'll understand the significance of having an african-american president sworn in for a second time. but today, there was a press conference at 5:00 p.m., which is the first time we heard from house speaker john boehner since december 21st. i'm sure that the
as a kind of, as ronald reagan liked to say, a city shining on the hill, what befuddles you most of all as you look at this debate about the place of guns and violence and the second amendment in america? >> i think one of the, um, one of the most interesting things for me to see with the discussion the idea that comes up over and over again about the futility of efforts to regulate guns. i think i one statistic that almost everybody e knows about guns in america is that we have about 300 million people and about 300 million guns. and that leads lots of people to just throw up their hands and think anything we do on the regulatory side is futile. i'm actually not that pessimistic myself, and i hope this is one of the themes that comes up in the public discussions as we move forward after the president announces tomorrow for two reasons. one thing that's really important to keep in mind with guns in america is that they are a very concentrated and very sedentary. so about 10% of all the people in the united states own about 80% of the guns. they're mostly middle class, middle-aged people
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)

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